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Apple Raises Prices, and Profits Keep Booming

SAN FRANCISCO — Since Apple introduced the iPhone 11 years ago, smartphones have become ubiquitous, and the market for them is saturated. To maintain growth, Apple has employed a shrewd strategy: Charge more for the devices.Journalists and analysts have explained how Apple is doing that by dividing the number of iPhones sold in a given quarter into the revenue Apple earns from them to calculate the average selling price.That’s not going to be so easy anymore.Apple said Thursday that it sold about as many iPhones in the latest quarter as it did a year earlier but that iPhone revenue rose 29 percent. That was because customers paid…

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Apple Unveils New iPad and MacBook Air

Apple showed off a slate of new computers with better screens, faster processors and higher price tags on Tuesday, including an iPad Pro that the company is trying to position as a primary work computer.The announcements included a new MacBook Air, the first major update since 2011 of Apple’s slimmest laptop, and a new Mac mini, Apple’s entry-level home computer.Apple tried to make its new iPad Pro the star of the show — one of its slick product-release events, this time at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. Like Apple’s iPhone released last year, the new iPad has much smaller borders around its screen, eliminating space for a…

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Strategies: Netflix’s Audience Is Multiplying. But So Is Its Debt.

Netflix, the streaming-video juggernaut, is growing with astonishing speed. And if you ignore the fact that it borrows billions to finance that growth, the company is a classic success story.Its ability to expand its global audience is truly impressive. The latest numbers show that Netflix gained more than six million paid subscribers around the world in the three months through September. That’s about 66,000 more paid subscribers every day, bringing its total to more than 130 million.Netflix’s extraordinary growth has disrupted the media landscape and entranced the stock market. As my colleague, Edmund Lee, has written, Netflix’s challenge has helped to motivate, if not entirely provoke, a…

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Bits: The Week in Tech: Apple Goes on the Attack

Each week, technology reporters and columnists from The New York Times review the week’s news, offering analysis and maybe a joke or two about the most important developments in the tech industry. Want this newsletter in your inbox? Sign up here.Hi, folks. I’m Jack Nicas, a reporter for The Times’s bureau in San Francisco, where two of us are rooting hard for the Red Sox, to the chagrin of our boss. (Those two are me and the editor who edited this, so we slipped it in.) I cover Apple, and this past week the news out of the world’s most valuable public company was not a new…

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Apple News’s Radical Approach: Humans Over Machines

Many of Apple’s employees moved into a glistening new $5 billion glass headquarters in Cupertino, Calif., this year. A mile west, at Apple’s old campus on 1 Infinite Loop, a project antithetical to Silicon Valley’s ethos is now underway.In a quiet corner of the third floor, Apple is building a newsroom of sorts. About a dozen former journalists have filled a few nondescript offices to do what many other tech companies have for years left to software: selecting the news that tens of millions of people will read.One morning in late August, Apple News’s editor in chief, Lauren Kern, huddled with a deputy to discuss the five…

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Tech Fix: Apple iPhone XR Review: A Cheaper Phone Suited to Most of Us

ImageThe iPhone XR, priced at about $750, comes in six colors: white, black, blue, yellow, coral and red.CreditNoah Berger/Agence France-Presse — Getty ImagesGood news, Apple loyalists: You won’t have to burn $1,000 on your next iPhone. That’s because for about $750, you can have the iPhone XR, which is just as fast and nearly as capable as its more expensive counterparts.The cheaper iPhone, which becomes available this Friday, is the model that most people should buy. This year’s other iPhones — namely the XS and XS Max devices, which cost about $1,000 and $1,100 and are already in stores — are luxury devices better suited for enthusiasts…

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The Week in Tech: Fears of the Supply Chain in China

Each week, technology reporters and columnists from The New York Times review the week’s news, offering analysis and maybe a joke or two about the most important developments in the tech industry. Want this newsletter in your inbox? Sign up here.Hello, everyone. I’m Paul Mozur, a reporter based in Shanghai, and I have covered technology in Asia for eight years. Though lately the big story has been internet companies, hardware and the supply chain remains close to my heart. Maybe that’s why the tech news bombshell a little over a week ago has been so fascinating to me.An astonishing piece released by Bloomberg on Oct. 4 described…

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The New Health Care: That New Apple Watch EKG Feature? There Are More Downs Than Ups

The watch will also have an “irregular rhythm” notification feature, which alerts people to potential problems. There’s every reason to believe it will generate many false positives. Before granting clearance, the F.D.A. reviewed data collected by the Stanford Heart study for 266 people who got such a notification. Most of the notifications were wrong.The study wasn’t peer reviewed, so we don’t know for sure, but this was also a population for whom atrial fibrillation might be more common than in those who might use the watches. People who buy the latest Apple watch will most likely be younger, healthier, wealthier and more plugged into the health care…

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Bits: The Week in Tech: A Breach That Ripples Far Beyond Facebook

Here in India, Facebook is a far more essential part of the internet than it is in the United States. Many companies and organizations have no websites, just a Facebook page. Small businesses sell their wares on the social network as well as the company’s Instagram photo site and WhatsApp. To #deletefacebook — as WhatsApp’s co-founder Brian Acton recently recommended — would be to cut yourself off from much of the digital life of this country. There is no real substitute.Indians are generally less concerned about privacy than Americans, blithely disclosing birth dates, their mother’s maiden name and their cellphone numbers. Late last month, the country’s Supreme…

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Senators Call for Federal Investigation of Children’s Apps

Two Democratic senators are calling on federal regulators to investigate whether children’s apps improperly collect personal data and whether app stores are misleading parents by labeling the apps as child-friendly.Senators Edward J. Markey of Massachusetts and Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut sent a letter to the Federal Trade Commission on Wednesday saying they were concerned that thousands of apps may “improperly track children and collect their personal information.”The senators asked the agency to examine whether the apps, and the advertising companies they work with, were violating a federal law to protect children’s privacy online. The law requires sites and apps aimed at children under 13 to obtain verifiable…

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