India's No. 1 Affordable Computer Franchise (ISO Certified, Govt. Approved) | Get approval in 10 Hours. For Inquiries: CALL +91-9774064470

When the A.I. Professor Leaves, Students Suffer, Study Says

SAN FRANCISCO — For years, big tech companies have used huge salaries, bonuses and stock packages to lure artificial intelligence experts out of academia. Now, a study released on Friday says that migration has hurt the post-college prospects of students.The study, the first of its kind, was conducted by researchers at the University of Rochester. They found that over the last 15 years, 153 artificial intelligence professors in North American universities left their posts for industry. An additional 68 moved into industry while retaining part-time roles with their universities.This migration has greatly increased in recent years, the study said. From 2004 to 2009, 26 university professors moved…

Continue Reading

This High-Tech Solution to Disaster Response May Be Too Good to Be True

SEATTLE — The company called One Concern has all the characteristics of a buzzy and promising Silicon Valley start-up: young founders from Stanford, tens of millions of dollars in venture capital and a board with prominent names.Its particular niche is disaster response. And it markets a way to use artificial intelligence to address one of the most vexing issues facing emergency responders in disasters: figuring out where people need help in time to save them.That promise to bring new smarts and resources to an anachronistic field has generated excitement. Arizona, Pennsylvania and the World Bank have entered into contracts with One Concern over the past year. New…

Continue Reading

And Now, a Bicycle Built for None

As corporate giants like Ford, G.M. and Waymo struggle to get their self-driving cars on the road, a team of researchers in China is rethinking autonomous transportation using a souped-up bicycle.This bike can roll over a bump on its own, staying perfectly upright. When the man walking just behind it says “left,” it turns left, angling back in the direction it came.It also has eyes: It can follow someone jogging several yards ahead, turning each time the person turns. And if it encounters an obstacle, it can swerve to the side, keeping its balance and continuing its pursuit.It is not the first-ever autonomous bicycle (Cornell University has…

Continue Reading

London Lab Advances Use of A.I. in Health Care, but Raises Privacy Concerns

SAN FRANCISCO — Each year, one out of every five patients admitted to a hospital in the United States for serious care develops acute kidney injury.For a variety of reasons, these patients’ kidneys suddenly stop functioning normally and become unable to properly remove toxins from the bloodstream. The condition can permanently damage the kidneys, cause other illnesses or even lead to death. Acute kidney disease, or A.K.I., contributes to nearly 300,000 deaths in the United States each year, according to a 2016 study.But if the condition is identified in its early stages and properly treated, it can be stopped or reversed.In a paper published on Wednesday in…

Continue Reading

Toby Walsh, A.I. Expert, Is Racing to Stop the Killer Robots

Toby Walsh, a professor at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, is one of Australia’s leading experts on artificial intelligence. He and other experts have released a report outlining the promises, and ethical pitfalls, of the country’s embrace of A.I. Recently, Dr. Walsh, 55, has been working with the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots, a coalition of scientists and human rights leaders seeking to halt the development of autonomous robotic weapons. We spoke briefly at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, where he was making a presentation, and then for two hours via telephone. Below is an edited version…

Continue Reading

Would You Want a Computer to Judge Your Risk of H.I.V. Infection?

ImageCreditJames SteinbergA few years ago, researchers at Harvard and Kaiser Permanente Northern California had an inspired idea: Perhaps they could use the wealth of personal data in electronic health records to identify patients at high risk of getting infected with H.I.V. Doctors could use an algorithm to pinpoint these patients and then steer them to a daily pill to prevent infection, a strategy known as PrEP. Now the scientists have succeeded. Their results, they say, show that it is possible to correctly identify men at high risk by examining medical data already stored about them. But the researchers know they must tread delicately in using the software…

Continue Reading

Hold ’Em or Fold ’Em? This A.I. Bluffs With the Best

In his 14 years on the professional poker circuit, Darren Elias had never faced anyone who played with so little fear.A typical poker player, when dealt two Jacks — one faceup, the other hidden, a hand neither good nor bad — would proceed with caution. But not Mr. Elias’s opponent, who seemed to know exactly what to do. Even when Mr. Elias decided to bluff, betting as if he held a strong hand, his opponent effectively called him on it: charging ahead, matching each bet with what seemed to be complete confidence, and winning.Even more remarkable: This opponent was a machine.The automated poker player, called Pluribus, was…

Continue Reading

Google and the University of Chicago Are Sued Over Data Sharing

SAN FRANCISCO — When the University of Chicago Medical Center announced a partnership to share patient data with Google in 2017, the alliance was promoted as a way to unlock information trapped in electronic health records and improve predictive analysis in medicine.On Wednesday, the University of Chicago, the medical center and Google were sued in a potential class-action lawsuit accusing the hospital of sharing hundreds of thousands of patients’ records with the technology giant without stripping identifiable date stamps or doctor’s notes.The suit, filed in United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, demonstrates the difficulties technology companies face in handling health data as they…

Continue Reading

A.I. May Not Take Your Job, but It Could Become Your Boss

When Conor Sprouls, a customer service representative in the call center of the insurance giant MetLife talks to a customer over the phone, he keeps one eye on the bottom-right corner of his screen. There, in a little blue box, A.I. tells him how he’s doing.Talking too fast? The program flashes an icon of a speedometer, indicating that he should slow down.Sound sleepy? The software displays an “energy cue,” with a picture of a coffee cup.Not empathetic enough? A heart icon pops up.For decades, people have fearfully imagined armies of hyper-efficient robots invading offices and factories, gobbling up jobs once done by humans. But in all of…

Continue Reading

The Gender Gap in Computer Science Research Won’t Close for 100 Years

SAN FRANCISCO — Women will not reach parity with men in writing published computer science research in this century if current trends hold, according to a study released on Friday.The enduring gender gap is most likely a reflection of the low number of women now in computer science, said researchers at the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence, a research lab in Seattle that produced the study. It could also reflect, in part, a male bias in the community of editors who manage scientific journals and conferences.Big technology companies are facing increasing pressure to address workplace issues like sexual harassment and a lack of representation by women as…

Continue Reading