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Tech We’re Using: When Cryptocurrencies Fluctuate, He Uses These Tech Tools to Keep Track

How do New York Times journalists use technology in their jobs and in their personal lives? Nathaniel Popper, who covers cryptocurrencies and financial technology for The Times from San Francisco, discussed the tech he’s using.There are many cryptocurrencies and they often fluctuate in value. What tech products do you use to keep your finger on the pulse?Most conversations about cryptocurrencies tend to start with the price, and there are now countless services that track the ups and downs of the thousands of digital tokens out there.The most popular site, Coinmarketcap.com, was briefly getting more visits than The Wall Street Journal’s home page last winter. My personal favorite…

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Replace ‘Tech’ With ‘Banks,’ and We’ve Seen a Big Comeuppance Before

SAN FRANCISCO — When I moved to the Bay Area two years ago, it was with a sense of relief.Relief from New York winters and deteriorating subways, yes. But also relief after six years of covering Wall Street, an industry that had moved from one crisis to another after the financial crash of 2008, drawing the unending wrath of the public.In California I was joining a growing team of reporters covering Silicon Valley, which had quickly become the new engine of the economy. Just like Wall Street before it lost its luster, the tech industry had become the destination of choice for the top college graduates. I…

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Uber Appoints New Head of Finance as It Marches Toward an I.P.O.

SAN FRANCISCO — After a yearslong search, Uber has finally found a chief financial officer as it advances toward an initial public offering.The ride-hailing company said Tuesday that it had hired Nelson J. Chai, 53, a former executive at Merrill Lynch and CIT Group, to be its new chief financial officer. The appointment fills a prominent void in Uber’s executive suite: The job had been vacant since Brent Callinicos departed in 2015.Picking a chief financial officer is crucial for Uber because the company has said it plans to go public by the end of 2019, in what is likely to be one of the biggest-ever technology I.P.O.s.…

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Tech Tip: Pay Off Those I.O.U.s on the Go

AdvertisementTECH TIPAlong with Apple Pay Cash, several apps and services make it easy to send and receive funds right on your phone, smartwatch or tablet.July 12, 2018Q. If I use Apple Pay Cash on my iPhone, can I send money to anybody? What do you need to do to set it up?A. To use the person-to-person cash feature of the Apple Pay system, you and your recipients need certain Apple hardware to exchange money through the Messages, Contacts or Siri apps. So for starters, you cannot use Apple Pay Cash to send electronic funds directly to someone who might be using Google Pay on an Android phone.Compatible…

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Despite Caution Over Cryptocurrency, Investors Are Bullish

What’s indisputable is that coin offerings are quickly growing in popularity. Roughly 309 offerings have been held this year, raising $10.3 billion, according to the data provider TokenData, compared with 77 offerings that raised $1.2 billion during the period last year.That is catching up to the amount of money raised by initial public offerings, where companies hire investment bankers to help sell shares to investors and trade on the public markets. I.P.O.s in the United States raised $15.6 billion in the first three months of this year, the biggest quarterly haul in three years, according to Renaissance Capital, which tracks I.P.O.s.But many entrepreneurs say they believe that,…

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The Week Ahead: Central Bankers Will Debate Policy, and OPEC Meets on Output

AdvertisementThe Week AheadThe Senate will also vote on an amendment that would block President Trump’s ZTE deal, and the Fox board will weigh Comcast’s $65 billion offer.Outside the offices of ZTE in Beijing. The Senate will vote on a proposal that would restore penalties brought against the company.CreditGilles Sabrié for The New York TimesBy The New York TimesJune 17, 2018Here’s what to expect in the week ahead:EconomyCentral bankers will debate economic policy.The mysteries of how prices and wages are determined will be the theme of discussions by economists and central bankers at the European Central Bank’s annual forum, which starts on Monday in Sintra, Portugal. The participants…

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Stephen Bannon Buys Into Bitcoin

WASHINGTON — Stephen K. Bannon, 10 months removed from the job of chief strategist to President Trump and five months after his ouster from the arch-conservative news site Breitbart News, is betting that Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies can disrupt banking the way Mr. Trump disrupted American politics.Mr. Bannon won’t reveal very much about his cryptocurrency plans — he worries that the controversy that comes with his name could have a bad impact on projects just getting off the ground.But he has had private meetings with cryptocurrency investors and hedge funds where he has discussed working on so-called initial coin offerings through his investment business, Bannon & Company.…

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One Firm Is Way Ahead of Wall Street on Bitcoin

Mr. Smith said that he could also imagine Bitcoin, or some competitor, becoming a digital payment method for the internet — as Jack Dorsey, Twitter’s chief executive, recently predicted — but that he wasn’t too worried if that didn’t happen.“We believe that this technology and this asset class is going to change some facet of financial services, and we think it is going to exist forever,” he said.Susquehanna first experimented with trading Bitcoin in 2014 after the investor twins Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss asked the firm about being involved with a Bitcoin E.T.F. that they had applied to regulators to create.Regulators eventually denied that application. But Susquehanna…

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Bitcoin Sees Wall Street Warm to Trading Virtual Currency

The virtual currency was created after the 2008 global financial crisis by a still-anonymous programmer who used the name Satoshi Nakamoto. The idea was to replace the existing banking structure with an online alternative that couldn’t be controlled by a handful of powerful organizations.But instead of being replaced, the old banks are beginning to assert their own role in the unorthodox financial world of virtual currency, sometimes called cryptocurrencies.While Bitcoin was originally intended to be used by consumers for all sorts of transactions — without any financial institutions getting involved — it has mostly become a virtual investment, stored in digital wallets and traded on mostly unregulated…

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Should the Fed Create ‘FedCoin’ to Rival Bitcoin? A Former Top Official Says ‘Maybe’

AdvertisementIf cryptocurrency and blockchain technology really are the future of money, the world’s central banks need to get involved, a former Fed governor argues.May 4, 2018ImageKevin Warsh in London in 2014. “It strikes me that a central bank digital currency might have a role to play,” he said Thursday night.CreditPool photo by Alastair GrantMany enthusiasts of Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies are motivated by deep skepticism of the central banks that control the world’s money supply.But what if central banks themselves entered the game? What would happen if the Federal Reserve, or the European Central Bank or the Bank of Japan used blockchain technology to create their own…

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