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Tech We’re Using: Windows on How Cities Change Can Be All Too Captivating

AdvertisementTech We’re UsingTechnology is crowding curbs with ride hailers and keeping homeowners fixated on housing values. Here are the tools that Emily Badger, a writer for The Upshot, uses to analyze the ripple effects. ImageEmily Badger, a reporter for The Upshot in Washington, likes Google Street View’s time-lapse feature, which can show a neighborhood’s transformation since 2007.CreditCreditTing Shen for The New York TimesSept. 19, 2018How do New York Times journalists use technology in their jobs and in their personal lives? Emily Badger, who writes about cities and urban policy for The Upshot in Washington, discussed the tech she’s using.Q. As a writer for The Upshot, you do…

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San Francisco Grants 2 Scooter Permits (but Not to the Early Disrupters)

A statement from Bird said, “While we are disappointed with today’s decision, we hope to have the opportunity to meet the needs of S.F. residents and to help the city achieve its transportation goals following this initial test period.” The company noted that it run a campaign that resulted in 30,000 emails to city officials expressing their support for Bird.“Today’s decision is disappointing,” said Toby Sun, Lime’s chief executive. “San Franciscans deserve an equitable and transparent process when it comes to transportation and mobility. Instead, the S.F.M.T.A. has selected inexperienced scooter operators that plan to learn on the job, at the expense of the public good.”The San…

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Peloton’s New Infusion Made It a $4 Billion Company in 6 Years

For Peloton’s first two years in business, venture capital investors didn’t get it. The company’s founders struggled to convince them that blending stationary bikes and streaming live video classes would work. It had to cobble together money from a network of more than 200 angel investors to get off the ground.But six years and a quarter of a million bikes later, the company is the toast of Silicon Valley. On Friday, Peloton announced it had raised $550 million in financing from prominent investors led by TCV, a firm known for investing in Facebook, Netflix and LinkedIn. Peloton has now raised $1 billion and is valued at $4…

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Lyft and Uber Won’t Be Happy Until They’re Your One-Stop Transit Guide

Get the DealBook newsletter to make sense of major business and policy headlines — and the power-brokers who shape them.__________Uber and Lyft came to prominence with their ride-hailing services. But increasingly they’re betting on other modes of transportation — with the aim of becoming the only service people need to get around cities.Lyft on Monday struck a deal to buy the core parts of Motivate, the parent company of CitiBike in New York and seven other bike-sharing programs around the United States. At first, that acquisition may seem puzzling — why would a ride-hailing giant want to get into the far smaller market for bicycles? — but…

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Lyft Follows Uber Into Bike-Sharing Lane, Buying Owner of CitiBike

Lyft competes with Uber for ride-hailing customers. Now it is following its rival into bike-sharing, as the companies move to diversify the kinds of transportation services they offer.Lyft said on Monday that it was buying the core operations of Motivate, the parent company of CitiBike and several similar programs in United States cities. The business, to be renamed Lyft Bikes, will maintain control of Motivate’s contracts with New York, Chicago and six other cities.The parts of Motivate that maintain bikes will remain a stand-alone company and continue to service Lyft Bikes.Financial terms were not disclosed, but media reports had previously suggested that Lyft would pay around $250…

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Uber to Buy Jump, Maker of Electric Bicycles, After Bike-Sharing Test

Uber said that the data from its ride network allows the company to understand the best locations to place the bicycles in different cities, so they can be used more frequently.Since starting the pilot program a few months ago, Uber has found that the average distance of a ride on a Jump bike is about 2.6 miles — which is not much different from how far customers travel on average for an Uber car ride. Each bike is also being used six or seven times a day.“The utilization of the bikes has been higher than expected,” Mr. Khosrowshahi said. “People are using these bikes for multiple trips…

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